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Preface, Content

 

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[II|III]

Gerhard Schwarz

Est Deus in nobis
The identity of God and Pure Practical Reason
in Immanuel Kant's "Critique of Practical Reason"

2004
TU Berlin Press

 

[III|IV] [...]

 

[VI|VII]

Preface


This book is a slightly altered version of the doctoral dissertation I presented to the Faculty I at the Technische Universität Berlin in June 2002.

I owe a particular debt of gratitude to Hans Poser (Berlin) and Walter Jaeschke (Bochum), who were my doctoral advisors for the entire six years of my research work. Their openness to my ideas, meticulous scholarship, encouragement, and constructive criticism were a constant support to my research work.

I would similarly like to thank all of those who provided, in debate and discussion, crucial advice on the direction of my research and, above all, encouraged me to pursue my thesis of the identity of God and reason in Kant despite all the established scholarly views to the contrary: Paul Gorner (Aberdeen), Frank Tasche (Berlin), Christa Hackenesch (Berlin), Heiko Roehl (Pretoria), Claude Piché (Montreal), Ian Kaplow (Hanover). My thanks also go to Hartmut Zinser (Berlin), who was an expert advisor, together with my two supervising tutors, on applications for grants.

I would especially like to thank my fellow graduates as well as my undergraduate students for the many fruitful discussions on a range of issues and problems around my research topic and the chance to continually test and rethink my ideas. My thanks are also due to the Cusanuswerk Bonn for a three-year scholarship allowing me to carry out a large part of the work for this research. Similarly, I would like to thank the TU Berlin Press for taking the book into its scheme for outstanding scholarly work at the Technische Universität Berlin.

My particular thanks go to Monika Kopyczinski (Berlin) and Matthias Wunsch (Berlin), without their comments and suggestions this book would not be what it is now. Their astuteness, expertise and dedication during the revision process provided crucial insights and inputs on textual, methodological, and stylistic [VII|VIII] issues as well as on the structure of the argument.

My research breaks new ground in Kant scholarship and I would like to encourage all scholars and researchers to continue with this new reading of Kant and investigate further the many indications of non-finite reason in Kant's philosophy. Over the years of working so closely with Kant's writings and ideas, I gradually became convinced of the truth of my original suspicion that previous research had overlooked or even systematically ignored central and key aspects for understanding Kant's philosophy. I am convinced that Kant's thought remains undiscovered in some central areas of his philosophy. Future research has a lot to do here. I would be glad if my outline of a new approach to understanding Kantian philosophy leads to a critical, yet open and scholarly forum for debate.

The website www.estdeusinnobis.de offers a contact address for specialist criticism and discussion. Reply by email to
.

Berlin, im Februar 2003

Gerhard Schwarz [VIII|IX]

 

 

Content



Introduction

A

Exposition of the Theses: Identity of God and Pure Practical Reason and the Identifiability of God and Rational Being

1

B

Target of Proof: The Theses of Identity and Identifiabilty as Explanatory Propositions of the Postulate of God in the Critique of Practical Reason

9

C

A New Interpretation of the Postulate of God in the Critique of Practical Reason

18



Part One: Defining the Line of Argumentation

1

Defining the Identity Argumentation

23

1.1

Starting Point of the Argumentation: Kant's Concept of the Highest Good and the Development of the Postulate of God

24

1.2

Distinguishing between Phenomenal Happiness and Noumenal Happiness-from-Freedom

51

1.3

Outline of the Identity Argumentation

83



Part Two: Developing the Argumentation

2

The Idea of Noumenal Happiness-from-Freedom within the Antinomy of Practical Reason

103

2.1

The Idea of Noumenal Happiness-from-Freedom in the Antinomy of Practical Reason

105
[IX|X]

2.2

The Idea of Noumenal Happiness-from-Freedom in the Resolution of the Antinomy of Practical Reason

115

2.3

The Sensible World as an Object of Pure Reason in its Practical Application: Kant's Model of Regarding Phenomena as Noumena

127

3

The Untenability of the Standard Interpretation: The Identity and Identifiabilty Theses as Valid Explanatory Propositions of the Postulate of God

147

3.1

The Start of the Postulate of God in the Standard Interpretation and the Identity Interpretation

149

3.2

The Idea of Noumenal Happiness-from-Freedom and the Rational Being's Authorship of the World in the Critique of Practical Reason's Immortality Argument

160

3.3

Happiness in the Object of Pure Practical Reason: Ideal of Reason or Ideal of Imagination?

165

3.4

The Practical Idea of the Rational Being's Authorship of the World. The Rational Being Conceived of as Merely-Finite Being and as a Finite but Potentially Non-Finite Being

180

4

The Validity of the Identity Interpretation – Supplementary Evidence, Consideration of Objections and Reservations

196

4.1

Kant's Explication of the Identity and Identifiabilty Concepts within the Horizon of the Doctrine of Postulates

200

4.2

Kant's Concept of the Rational Being as a Potentially Divine Being

206

4.3

The Rational Being's Authorship of the World within the Idea of Hope for Beatitude Connected with the Striving for Holiness

223

4.4

The Self-Misunderstanding of the Human Being as a Merely-Finite Being and the Excorporation of Pure Practical Reason to a God Different from the Human Being

246
[X|XI]



Summary and Outlook

A

Synopsis of the Identity Argumentation

271

B

Consequences of the Identity Interpretation for a New Reading of Kant's Philosophical Theology, Philosophy of Religion, Anthroponomy and Theory of Rationality

281




 

Abbreviations of Main Sources

299

 

References

300
[XI|XII]

 

 

 

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